Thursday, 17 December 2009

golite peak - another peak

As promised I've taken a closer look at the bag. The hip fins are easy to remove being held by Velcro tabs, double sided means a secure attachment but I'm still wondering about how well these will work with loads when approaching the claimed 30lb maximum.


Golite's rucksack ideology goes back to Ray Jardine who wasn't a fan of hip belts for the simple reason that if your load is as light as you can make it hip belts are effectively redundant. And since a lot of weight in rucksacks is the hip belt and back system it makes sense to strip these out or pare to the minimum to save weight. That said I still feel that even with lighter loads some transfer of weight to the hips is essential. It lowers your centre of gravity adding stability, and if you're running, jogging or scrambling then a hip belt will keep the load from moving about. From a personal point of view I won't bother to look at a rucksack that doesn't have pockets on the hip belt. Removing the hip fins will save 133g.


As stated the foam back insert is removable and can only be done if the 'sack is empty, and even then it's a struggle to get out as it fits tightly. I ran the foam under a tap and although it doesn't look like closed cell foam it didn't take up any water. If you use three quarter length mattress or pad then the bag can be put under your heels if required but I wouldn't bother going to the effort of taking the insert out. The foam insert weighs a measly 44g.

With the hip fins and back insert removed the stripped down weight is 586g.

8 comments:

Hendrik M said...

Ah Baz, you also got one of them Peaks, and a Scarp 1 Mk II is as good as delivered - sounds like happy holidays for you =)

As I said already to Martin Rye, I like the colour and the material its made of, but I limit myself to the two backpacks I have, and the Laufbursche pack which is made for me at the moment. If that wouldn't be the case, I might just get one.

baz carter said...

The Peak fits in my backpacking armoury; five litre increments between 35l and 50l.

As for thr Scarp Mk 2 I picked it up earlier and have had mimimum time to play :) Apart from getting the scales out - was hoping to get it pitched and spend some time this evening in it :) But not so :(

GeoffC said...

I agree about the advantage of transferring weight to the hips for all but the lightest loads (basically day-walk weights). Actually I wouldn't use a pack without a firm backpad, both for comfort reasons and to be less restrictive about how I distribute stuff in the pack.

baz carter said...

I never liked the idea of packs that you use a unfurled Karrimat as back padding. I dont sleeping on one in the first case and being precious about how you pack the bag is is a pain.

Joe Newton said...

Baz, have you used it on an overnighter yet?

I won't buy a backpack without hipbelt pockets either. I know a lot of the cottage manufacturers offer them as options but I prefer them built-in. I'm really interested in this pack but was slightly put off by the velcro hipbelt attatchments. I would be using this only for weekend trips though and my baseweight is nearer 9lb than 30lb so I'm guessing it will be fine. For me there is scope to lose a bit more weight by losing a few 'extras' like the hydration sleeve, ice axe cords (I use an OMM pack in winter), the Compaktor gubbins and cutting all the straps down.

baz carter said...

Hi Joe, I have used the Peak on a couple of overnighters (which I havent got round to writing up...)

I was concerned about the velcro too but I've had to issues with it thus far. And I must state that the hipbelt works a treat!

The weight of the kit carried was 11.5lbs added to this was food and water approx 4lb. A perfectly comfortable carry. So much so I am thinking of shedding my Ospreys for a 2010 Jam for longer trips.

Joe Newton said...

Thanks for the feedback Baz, it sounds like it will work perfectly for me. I'm looking at a Jam for longer trips too and I already have the Pinnacle which is great for fairly light but bulky loads of winter insulation.

baz carter said...

You could whittle some grams off the bag. How much you'd save would depend on how bloody minded you'd want to be :)